Inside Deep Throat

Dir: Fenton Bailey, Randy Barbato, 2005

9/10

1972’s pornographic feature, Deep Throat, changed the world of adult entertainment, forever.

Gone were the days of sitting in smoky back rooms, watching 8mm “loops” and “What The Butler Saw” peep shows, Gerard Damiano’s groundbreaking movie brought porn into the mainstream.

Unsurprisingly, a film that is now such a legend has quite a bit of history; much of it controversial.

Starring Linda Lovelace, Deep Throat concerns a woman who is unable to orgasm. After visiting a doctor (Harry Reems), she is told that her clitoris is deep down in her throat and should attempt fellatio in order to climax. It’s here where we get to see Lovelace’s “party trick”; the ability to facilitate large penises deep into her throat.

Inside Deep Throat is a brilliantly fascinating documentary that delves into the nooks and crannies of the creative process.

Featuring interviews with core people behind the film, there is an attempt to redress the balance caused by Linda Lovelace’s assertions in her book, Ordeal. Lovelace alleges that she was coerced into performing in the pornographic feature by her husband and manager, Chuck Traynor.

Lovelace details how Traynor pimped her out, beat her and threatened to shoot her if she didn’t do the film.

These allegations are disputed in the documentary by other parties involved in making  Deep Throat.  Contributors such as the director Gerard Damiano have stated that Lovelace willingly did the scenes and that she was not forced to do anything she didn’t want to.

It’s worth remembering that Linda Lovelace became a born again Christian and part of the anti-pornography movement so you have to take her story with a pinch of salt, as you have to with the defenders.

The documentary offers a fair and, somewhat, balanced view that allows the viewer to become more immersed in the film. Because it is unbiased in its narrative, Inside Deep Throat presents the evidence for both sides as to whether Lovelace lied about what had happened to her or whether the makers of the 1972 are using lies to defend tthemselves. We are given the option to make our own minds up.

Engrossing and captivating, this is one of the best documentaries about film, ever produced.

A winner.

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